MemAerobics: a Cognitive Intervention to Improve Memory Ability and Reduce Depression in Older Adults

Item

Title
MemAerobics: a Cognitive Intervention to Improve Memory Ability and Reduce Depression in Older Adults
Author
Robert G Winningham
Roger Anunsen
Lisa M. Hanson
Lindsay Laux
Karissa D. Kaus
Andrew Reifers
Publication Date
1/1/2003
Abstract
Numerous researchers have shown that older adults who participate in memory enhancement programs can improve their memory abilities. However, previous research has generally focused on "young-old" adults (i.e., under 75 years of age). We replicated these findings with an older assisted living facility population using a new program called MemAerobics<sup>TM</sup>. This program could be used by other long-term care facilities to both improve and maintain residents' overall wellness. Volunteers participated in one of two experimental conditions: either a cognitive enhancement intervention specifically designed to stimulate cognitive activity (known as MemAerobics) or a control group that did not participate in any extra activities. Before the intervention, all participants completed a battery of standardized tests designed to measure memory ability, beliefs in the efficacy in their memory, life satisfaction, and depression. After three-months of MemAerobics exercises, all participants were reassessed with the same measures to determine the magnitude and direction of changes as a function of their intervention group. The results indicated that MemAerobics participants experienced an increase in memory ability as well as a decrease in depressive symptoms.
Publisher
Springer
Volume Number
9
Issue Number
3
First Page Number
183
Last Page Number
192
Type
Text
Department
Psychological Sciences
Language
eng
Citation
Winningham, R. G., Anunsen, R., Hanson, L. M., Laux, L., Kaus, K. D., & Reifers, A. (2003). MemAerobics: A cognitive intervention to improve memory ability and reduce depression in older adults. Journal of Mental Health and Aging, 9(3), 183-192.
Identifier
fac_pubs/14
Source
Journal of Mental Health and Aging
note
This is the authors' final accepted (peer-reviewed) manuscript. The final publication is copyrighted by Springer.