Hedonic versus Eudaimonic Conceptions of Well-Being: Evidence of Differential Associations with Self-Reported Well-Being

Item

Title
Hedonic versus Eudaimonic Conceptions of Well-Being: Evidence of Differential Associations with Self-Reported Well-Being
Identifier
fac_pubs/34
Date
8/1/2011
Abstract
Conceptions of well-being are cognitive representations of the nature and experience of well-being. These conceptions can be described generally by the degree to which hedonic and eudaimonic dimensions are emphasized as important aspects of the experience of well-being. In two studies, the prediction that eudaimonic dimensions of individual conceptions of well-being are more robustly associated with self-reported well-being than hedonic dimensions was investigated. Correlational analyses indicated that both hedonic and eudaimonic dimensions were associated with well-being, with more robust associations observed between the eudaimonic dimension and each measure of well-being. In several regression analyses, only the eudaimonic dimension significantly predicted well-being, with the hedonic dimension failing to account for unique variance in well-being beyond that predicted by the eudaimonic dimension. Results thus generally suggest that conceptualizing well-being in eudaimonic terms may be relatively more important for positive psychological functioning.
Publisher
Springer
Language
eng
Type
Text
department or school name within institution
Psychological Sciences
Source
Social Indicators Research
volume
103
issue
1
page start
93
page end
108
note
This is the author's accepted manuscript. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11205-010-9698-0
Key Words
well-being, lay conceptions, hedonism, eudaimonia, pleasure, happiness
history note
24422
Creator
Ethan A McMahan
David Estes