The Effects of Color Preference on Word List Recall

Item

Title
The Effects of Color Preference on Word List Recall
Author
Aubrey Fear
Faculty Sponsor
Joel Alexander
Gavin Keulks
Date
5/1/2016
Abstract
The current study hypothesized that the group allowed to choose a color from a list will recall more words from a word recall list than the group that is assigned the color black. 50 non-colorblind participants (9 male) with a mean age of 22.5 (SD= 6.40) were recruited from a University subject pool, and offered extra credit in a psychology class in exchange for their participation in this study. The word list (20 five-letter words) was gathered from braingle.com, a site with numerous memory lists and activities. The independent variable, color, was manipulated between black and a color selected by the participant. The dependent variable was the number of words from the list that the participant could recall. If a significant positive relationship is found between preferential color and the number of words recalled, it would indicate that using a preferential color for studying may yield better tests scores as compared to those who study in the standard black color. The results calculated with a 2 sex x 2 group factorial design revealed no significant difference between the experiment and control groups.
Type
Text
Honors Thesis
Department
Honors Program
Language
eng
Rights
Western Oregon University Library has determined, as of 06/01/2023, this item is in copyright, which is held by the author. Users may use the item in accordance with copyright limitations and exceptions, including fair use. For other uses, please ask permission from the author.
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Identifier
honors_theses/92
keywords
Color, recall, color preference, short term memory